Stop using your vintage Tupperware NOW. These measuring cups are positive for 2,103 ppm Lead + 250 ppm Arsenic.

To share this post on Facebook, click here (also please read the comment threads here and on Facebook, they are very entertaining!)

Introduction: Tamara Rubin is a independent advocate for consumer goods safety and she is also a mother of Lead-poisoned children. She began testing consumer goods for toxicants in 2009 and was the parent-advocate responsible for finding Lead in the popular fidget spinner toys in 2017. She uses XRF testing (a scientific method used by the Consumer Product Safety Commission) to test consumer goods for contaminants including Lead, Cadmium, Mercury and Arsenic. [bio link]


I was so excited to test these vintage Tupperware items; I had heard they could be positive for very high levels of Lead, and have always discouraged people from using them — but had never personally tested any vintage Tupperware cookware items that were positive for toxicants…until…now! While I knew they might have Lead, I was frankly quite surprised to also find Arsenic!

In follow up testing of other product colors (after originally posting this piece) I also found some colors to test positive for Mercury and Cadmium.

To see the test results for other vintage Tupperware colors I have tested click one of the images above or click on the corresponding color: ORANGEGREENBROWNYELLOW.

To read all of my posts related to toxicants found in Tupperware products, click here.

When tested with an XRF instrument, these “Daffodil Yellow” vintage  (c, 1972) Tupperware measuring cups pictured here had the following readings:

  • Lead (Pb): 2,103 +/- 41 ppm 
  • Arsenic (As): 250 +/- 28 ppm 
  • Chromium (Cr): 735 +/- 68 ppm
  • Zinc (Zn): 463 +/- 18 ppm
  • Nickel (Ni): 20 +/- 8 ppm
  • Iron (Fe): 51 +/- 19 ppm
  • Vanadium (V): 239 +/- 155 ppm
  • Titanium (Ti): 10,100 +/- 400 ppm

For Context: The amount of Lead that is considered toxic in a newly manufactured item intended for use by children is anything 90 ppm Lead or higher in the paint or coating, or 100 ppm Lead (or higher) in the substrate.

Read more: Why do vintage plastic items have Lead?

If you are new to this blog and want to learn more about XRF testing (which is one of the primary scientific testing methodologies used by the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) to test for Lead and other toxicants in modern consumer goods intended for use by children) click here and here.

Tests on these measuring cups were done multiple times, for a minimum of 60 seconds each. Metals not detected by the XRF in consumer goods mode are not listed. All consumer goods test results reported on this blog are replicable.

Read more: How can I tell if my Tupperware items have Lead, Cadmium, Mercury or Arsenic?

This is another good example that supports the consideration that “Made in the USA” does not automatically always mean Lead-safe (especially when it comes to vintage items!) Click here to see more “Made in the USA” items that I have tested.

Takeaway: Especially in the absence of leach testing or other proof by the manufacturer that these items are safe, vintage functional food use items like this (that are positive for toxicants at high levels when tested with an XRF instrument) should be disposed of (or at least set aside until more information is available from the manufacturer.) Since originally posting this information many of my readers have followed up with Tupperware and it is my understanding (from what my readers have reported back to me) that Tupperware has not done leach testing for toxicants on these vintage items, as it was not required at the time they were manufactured.

Of additional concern is that many of these vintage Tupperware pieces have been kept in regular daily service for their 40+ years of life and may have considerable wear and deterioration as a result of decades of heavy regular use. So even if they were not leaching at the time of manufacture they may be leaching now – four or five decades later.

While there may not be a single incident of Lead poisoning (or Arsenic poisoning for that matter) that can be traced to a kitchen item like this (because that is a difficult thing to track and study, given how many potential sources of toxicants can be found in our lives – in many things we use every day), with multiple toxicants present, at the levels found here, there is no defensible reason to save items like this and use them for food use purposes — when there are inexpensive toxicant-free alternatives readily available today in nearly every store that sells kitchen goods (and nearly every grocery store for that matter).

The concern to consider is not so much “whether or not these specific cups might be poisoning you” but more along the lines of “what are the potential sources of environmental toxicity in our lives [sources that together can create an aggregate negative impact on our health] and what simple things we can do to eliminate possible exposure sources, giving our families (and especially our children and our grandchildren) a better chance at a healthier life.”

This concern becomes even greater with some of the other Tupperware examples which (as I understand it) have been marketed by the manufacturer as safe for microwave use. Any time you are heating plastics that contain toxicants (especially if the contents of the vessel contains food that may be acidic in any way – like lemon juice, vinegar or tomato sauce) there is a greater potential for those toxicants to leach into the food.

For a safer choice in measuring cups, click here for options.

I specifically discourage collecting items like this merely for the sake of collecting as well (even if you set them aside as a collectable item only for display), because a child might play with them at some point in the future, and regardless of whether or not the potential negative health implications of Lead in vintage plastic (for example) has been studied at this point, it is not worth any potential risk.

Since publishing this post, one mother shared the following story with me: She has these exact measuring cups and she regularly gives them to her toddler to play with. Given he is a toddler and these cups are plastic, he likes to chew on them and they are now covered in bite marks. This is a terrific example of why we should not have items like this in our homes when there are readily available safer alternatives.

In general, please consider avoiding using any vintage kitchenware for food-use purposes in your home.

To see more vintage plastic items that I have tested, click here.

I get the following question a lot: “My mom says we grew up with these and we’re ‘fine‘ – how do I respond to that?” Click here to read my answer.

As always, thank you for reading and for sharing my posts. When you share my posts I earn – very modest – advertising income that helps support the cost of my childhood Lead-poisoning prevention advocacy work and independent consumer goods testing and reporting.

Please let me know if you have any questions. I try to answer all questions personally, although with recent increased readership on my blog it may take me a while to respond!

Tamara Rubin
#LeadSafeMama

213 Responses to Stop using your vintage Tupperware NOW. These measuring cups are positive for 2,103 ppm Lead + 250 ppm Arsenic.

  1. Teresa March 10, 2019 at 4:27 pm #

    These measuring cups are plastic. So the lead is impregnated in the plastic itself? I thought it was only paint that had lead. Plastic itself is made with lead?

    • Tamara March 10, 2019 at 4:41 pm #

      Hi Teresa,

      Yes – much vintage plastic has Lead. There are lots of examples of that here on this blog. Here’s the link to the “vintage plastic” category on my blog: https://tamararubin.com/category/vintage-plastic/

      Tamara

      • Linda Peterson March 11, 2019 at 10:10 am #

        What about the yellow canisters and the brown pitcher?

      • Jann March 11, 2019 at 12:52 pm #

        so how do these metals get shed from the plastic and in what amounts over what period of time? Unless we know this, we know nothing is dangerous yet

        • Shelli March 18, 2019 at 1:08 pm #

          That is the million dollar question as I have used my mother’s tupperware since the day they started selling it and I’m over 50+ and my children and grandchildren use it and non of us have any increased amount of any lead, or other things listed that Tupperware contains, however I’m not disputing it’s not there I just don’t see the extreme caution this has been made to be as lead comes in many forms as well as other contaminants harmful to us imo

          • Tamara March 18, 2019 at 4:26 pm #

            Hi Shelli,

            When you say “none of us have any increased amount of any lead, or other things listed” – have you done testing for these metals separately?

            It is rare to get a metals test for Arsenic, Mercury and Cadmium. Usually you need a hair test or provoked urine test to get information about the body burden of those types of metals and most doctors don’t offer those routinely (if at all).

            Blood Lead tests (BLLs) are more common but, even for children, these are also are not routinely administered to all children in most states (you usually have to specifically request one when you are getting blood work done). It is especially uncommon for adults to have a Blood Lead Level test – unless they are an adult with a potential industrial or occupational exposure concern (like someone who works in a battery plant, for example.)

            It’s truly hard to measure what the specific potential health impact of an exposure like this might be – but it is always better to err on the side of caution. I like to share this post with folks who question what the potential health implications might be given persistent chronic (low-level) heavy metal exposure from daily use of vintage kitchenware and other vintage items: https://tamararubin.com/2015/02/fine/

            What is not a question is the fact that these items are testing positive for levels of toxicants that governmental regulatory agencies across the world have deemed to be harmful to humans.

            Thank you for commenting.

            Tamara

      • Dawn March 12, 2019 at 9:06 am #

        Are the “white” plastic vintage storage containers full of lead as well? Thanks

        • Tamara March 12, 2019 at 9:11 am #

          Hi Dawn,

          Thank you for commenting. I haven’t yet tested those. I will let you know as soon as I do! Keep an eye on the blog here.

          Tamara

        • rebecca k foster March 18, 2019 at 9:52 pm #

          This was my question too

        • Tamara March 19, 2019 at 10:38 am #

          Hi Dawn,

          I have recently tested some white ones and they were negative for toxicants, so the presence of toxicants appears to definitely be related to colorants used in the plastic. I will be posting about that shortly.

          Tamara

          • Joan Engle March 19, 2019 at 12:36 pm #

            The old clear plastic ones get sticky to the touch. Is there an address to Tupperware Company?

          • Tamara March 19, 2019 at 3:37 pm #

            Hi Joan, I’m sorry I don’t have a contact address or number for them yet. If you find one, please feel free to share it here on the blog in the comments. Thank you!

            Tamara

      • JoAnna March 12, 2019 at 10:45 pm #

        I use these and to date I am lead free. Before we scare people maybe we should suggest they get themselves tested for lead first.

        • Tamara March 12, 2019 at 11:22 pm #

          Hi JoAnna,

          Most people don’t realize that doctors don’t always do blood lead testing (especially on adults) unless it is specifically requested or indicated for some reason. Additionally most blood lead tests do not report down to levels that might be indicative of chronic low level exposure from non-occupational sources. For an adult woman I would want to see a blood lead test done to a low threshold of 0.1 Micrograms Per Deciliter, however many tests for adult women have a low threshold of 5.0 micrograms per deciliter (not sensitive enough to detect ongoing low level chronic exposure from food or water for example).

          You can read more about blood lead testing considerations on this post that I wrote recently: https://tamararubin.com/2019/02/blood-lead-testing-please-get-everyone-in-the-family-tested-since-you-have-been-living-in-a-house-with-high-lead-paint/

          Thank you for commenting.

          My goal is never to scare people, but to inform them of the presence of toxicants so they can make intentional choices for their family.

          Tamara

        • Denise Guin March 14, 2019 at 2:48 am #

          Yes JoAnna! Thank you!
          As a Tupperware consultant and a kid who grew up with these products, I am totally offended by this post. This woman is no scientist.
          If my company’s products were poisoning people with lead all these years, we would have heard about it LOOOOOOONG ago!

          • Tamara March 14, 2019 at 9:44 am #

            Hi Denise,

            As I haven mentioned in other posts, it is surprising to me that people are offended by toxicants found in 50 year old products when there was little-to-no regulation limiting the presence of these toxicants.

            Please read my response to Susan (posted earlier) with link that support the validity of my work:

            Tamara
            __________________________
            Susan,

            If you look through the history of my work I have been a pioneer in this. Typically after I discover something then a local scientific organization or nonprofit will do a formal official study and confirm my results. Being the first person to discover something (using scientific methodology as I do) does not invalidate those discoveries.

            Please check out this link (from CBS This Morning) about my work discovering Lead in fidget spinners: https://www.cbsnews.com/news/fidget-spinners-high-levels-of-lead-consumer-advocacy-organization-report/

            Also here is a study that a scientist did about the concern for Lead in glassware, about 8 years after I initially reported the issue: https://tamararubin.com/2017/11/decorated-glassware/

            And here (more relevant to the Tupperware concern) is a study about toxicants found in vintage plastic toys, a study done about 7 years after I discovered this to be a concern: https://www.neha.org/sites/default/files/publications/jeh/JEH-JanFeb2015-Vintage-Toys.pdf

            Just because I am a pioneer in this work, does not make findings inaccurate or untrue. Please share that with the Tupperware community.

            Tamara

          • Rob Moore March 15, 2019 at 5:10 am #

            Another attempt to ruin Tupperware’s stellar reputation.
            I wonder how much Tamara is being paid to do this? I don’t see a single mention of current Tupperware and the measures that are taken to ensure a safe product, plus the hundreds of thousands of employees that depend on the product sales for their livelihood.
            Shame on you Tamara

          • Tamara March 15, 2019 at 9:41 am #

            Hi Rob,

            I am a mother of Lead poisoned children and I test consumer goods for toxicants and report them on my blog. I test things that my readers send me and that they want tested. There is never any intention to ruin the reputation of any company, just to report the truth. I report the presence or absence of toxicants in consumer goods that my readers send me.

            I had a net loss of $12,000 for my work last year (in terms of responding to your question of how much I am being paid.) In the future I hope to have a sustainable income from my work informing families (and especially informing young mothers) of the toxicants I find in everyday household products. This is a more-than-full-time-job for me and I hope eventually to be compensated appropriately. In the meantime I do this because it is the right thing todo and because no one else is doing this.

            Tamara

          • Susan Kinyon March 15, 2019 at 8:34 pm #

            We all bought Tupperware decades ago. I’m still using a couple of pieces and, yes, the measuring cups as well. These people will post negative stuff about any and everything! Nothing is positive in their world.

            But they will “research” stuff and find something wrong with it!!! Let ’em worry for the rest of their lives. I prefer to enjoy my life and those I love, rather than frighten them with terror and nonsense. We’re all going to die. I’ll go naturally and gracefully; not afraid of anything.

            Tupperware is the least of my concerns.

      • debora lewis March 13, 2019 at 12:18 am #

        I have the old yellow Servalier canister set from the seventies does it contain lead

        • Tamara March 19, 2019 at 10:40 am #

          Hi Debora, I have not yet tested any of the canisters – although hope to have some test results for those soon, stand by!

          Tamara

      • Teresa March 18, 2019 at 4:37 pm #

        Ok, I want to know…if I measure out 1 cup of sugar from one of these Tupperware measuring cups, how much of the lead and how much of the arsenic is transferred to that cup of sugar?

      • Chrissi March 19, 2019 at 4:01 pm #

        Would the toxic chemicals be from the colourants used in the plastic ? I’m in the UK and people like vintage kitchenware here too, I noticed if I use certain spices even modern plastics become sticky so personally prefer glass ceramic or steel utensils but even they can be risky because of what is used to colour them

    • Tamara March 10, 2019 at 5:20 pm #

      Teresa, an additional note from my husband Len:

      “It is quite common for plastic, vinyl or rubber items to be subjected to lead baths; it is a manufacturing process used to increase the flexibility/pliability of the material (making it more supple/so it can be formed in to molded shapes.)”

      Tamara

      • Teresa March 10, 2019 at 5:36 pm #

        So even modern plastic plates and cups might be impregnated with lead? This isn’t just an issue for a vintage items?

        • Tamara March 10, 2019 at 5:58 pm #

          Teresa,

          No, not generally. It is rare to find modern plastic kitchenware items positive for high levels of lead. They are almost always negative. The new plastic also feels different than these vintage plastic items that tend to be leaded. The newer plastic (like you might find in modern plastic plates and cups) is usually harder/stiffer and more brittle than the vintage (more likely leaded) plastics.

          On the other hand – I have found many of the black and red rubberized modern plastic handles on utensils (like spatulas) positive for Lead (and even Arsenic) at much lower levels however – like 10 to 40 ppm.

          Tamara

          • Teresa March 10, 2019 at 6:12 pm #

            Have you posted your tests of the rubberized modern plastic handles anywhere? I’d love the link!

            Also, is there any concern for disposable plastic ware, like the red plastic cups people like to use at parties, or plastic utensils?

            I’ve wondered a lot about paper plates and paper bowls that have printed patterns on them. Have you ever tested those items?

          • Teresa March 11, 2019 at 5:53 pm #

            Have you posted your tests of the rubberized modern plastic handles anywhere? I’d love the link!

            Also, is there any concern for disposable plastic ware, like the red plastic cups people like to use at parties, or plastic utensils?

            I’ve wondered a lot about paper plates and paper bowls that have printed patterns on them. Have you ever tested those items?

          • Tamara March 15, 2019 at 2:19 pm #

            Hi Teresa,

            Here is an example of that: https://tamararubin.com/2018/07/leadsafe-2018-new-oxo-goodgrips-silicone-flexible-turner/

            Tamara

          • Matilda March 16, 2019 at 7:54 pm #

            Thank you for the information.

      • Renee March 11, 2019 at 6:08 pm #

        What about the Tupperware from the early 80’s? I have these measuring cups. But it’s all from 84.

      • sue March 11, 2019 at 7:19 pm #

        Does this include the clear Tupperware containers or just the colored ones?

        • jessica March 12, 2019 at 4:55 pm #

          I’d like to know this too. I have clear based tupperware with coloured flexible lids.

      • Carolyn Richardson March 12, 2019 at 6:20 pm #

        What about all the rubber spatulas that I use every day?

    • Donna March 11, 2019 at 11:01 am #

      Plastics are colored with pellets that go into the natural plastic resin. Some are pellets, some liquid. So basically just like paint gets tinted with color, so does plastic. I would assume that is where the lead came into the plastic product.

    • Peggy March 11, 2019 at 3:58 pm #

      What about the orange ones?

      • Tamara March 11, 2019 at 5:10 pm #

        Hi Peggy,

        What’s your address? 😉

        Tamara

        • Lisa March 13, 2019 at 10:04 am #

          I would like to know the answer to this?

      • Brittany March 13, 2019 at 7:00 pm #

        I am curious too! My mom has orange ones

      • Donna Carter March 18, 2019 at 2:58 pm #

        Does this just apply to the measuring cups? Are other items effected as well.?

        • Tamara March 18, 2019 at 4:15 pm #

          Hi Donna,

          I have tested bowls, cups and measuring cups – as well as a funnel – that have been positive for toxicants. So far the colors of concern are ORANGE, GREEN and YELLOW. I will be doing more testing and reporting soon, on other items and other colors. You can see all of the posts I have written on this subject by clicking here: https://tamararubin.com/category/tupperware/

          Thank you for commenting. Please let me know if you have any additional questions.

          Tamara

    • JR March 12, 2019 at 10:35 am #

      It’s for color. Lead- and cadmium-based pigments were routinely used in plastics well into the 1980s and even later.

    • Tammy Priest March 12, 2019 at 4:53 pm #

      late 80s they were country blue and mauve pink….I sold TW in the late 80s and sell again now….it is a lot different process now but would still like to see results from new stuff too to make sure what I tell people is accurate….

    • Cheryl lecea March 12, 2019 at 5:00 pm #

      How about the orange drink pitcher and white canisters with pink lids?

    • Gloria knowles March 13, 2019 at 3:52 pm #

      Um, I dont cook with my measuring cups? So wheres the harm??

    • Kelly Shike March 15, 2019 at 5:30 am #

      What about any other colors? I have three different sets. I stopped using mixing bowls because making a white cake my mixer was taking red chunks of the bowl off making the cake mix look pink. I hate plastic working on all glass cooking items. Thanks so much for notice.

    • Eric March 17, 2019 at 12:39 pm #

      We’ve had a yellow set that looks just like these for forty years. I’m not going to lose any sleep over this revelation, although we will dispose of these and buy new ones.

      • Tamara March 17, 2019 at 2:18 pm #

        Hi Eric,

        Thank you for commenting. I think that is exactly the right response! 🙂

        Tamara

    • Jeff March 19, 2019 at 6:31 pm #

      My thoughts are just don’t eat them (the plastic cups). Lead is not like radiation. You are not going to be poisoned by lead if you measure out your flour or chicolate chips with a plastic measuring cup. You are more likely to get diabetes than lead poisoning. Use your mind and think FFS.

      • Tamara March 19, 2019 at 7:07 pm #

        Interesting that you mention diabetes, Jeff. You should google the links between diabetes (kidney failure) and lead exposure. And remember – it just takes a microscopic amount of lead to poison a human, more info about that here: https://tamararubin.com/2019/03/the-sugar-packet-analogy-how-much-lead-dust-does-it-take-to-poison-a-child/

        In the absence of leach testing it is a fact that these have an unsafe level of lead by today’s standards and I would personally set them aside until Tupperware has done testing to confirm they are not a hazard to humans. #FirstDoNoHarm #KnowBetterDoBetter.

        Tamara

  2. Peggy March 10, 2019 at 4:44 pm #

    I have orange measuring cups, as well as canisters in orange. Any concerns there?

    • Tamara March 10, 2019 at 5:22 pm #

      Hi Peggy,

      I haven’t tested the orange ones yet. One of my readers is sending me a set and I will be posting the test results as soon as they are available.

      Tamara

      • Whitney March 10, 2019 at 5:36 pm #

        I am curious because my mom had the orange ones too! I think they are circa 1987-ish (because she had a Tupperware party when I was about 1…. And we still have 2 toys from that party my kids play with)…

        • Tamara March 10, 2019 at 5:55 pm #

          Oh that’s great info on the possible age / year of manufacture. Thank you for sharing, Whitney!

          Tamara

          • Celina March 19, 2019 at 8:20 pm #

            I have had my orange set since 76.

          • Tamara March 19, 2019 at 8:27 pm #

            Oh Thanks. Yes – that probably has mercury and cadmium, based on my findings so far.

            T

      • Faye Triantis March 10, 2019 at 9:53 pm #

        I have the cream coloured Tupperware from the 70’s. Is it safe?

        • Tamara March 10, 2019 at 10:50 pm #

          Hi Faye,

          I have not tested them yet. There’s a chance that they are negative and these toxicants are only present in the yellow ones. I have a few people shipping me more colors to test and I will share the results here on my blog. If you want to be among the first to know, subscribe to my e-mails or RSS feed and you will get an update when I publish those results.

          Tamara

          • Karen March 11, 2019 at 7:09 am #

            I have the canister set of the same plus the measuring cups. Are the canisters toxic too?

        • Rose March 12, 2019 at 4:50 am #

          I also have the same set and would like to know if they’re safe.

      • Kim March 11, 2019 at 10:10 am #

        Yes, I’d like to know about the orange ones too, as I still have a set and use them all the time.

        • Tamara March 11, 2019 at 10:55 am #

          Hi Kim!

          Thank you for commenting. Stay tuned. I expect to have the orange ones tested this week!

          Tamara

          • Reno March 11, 2019 at 4:23 pm #

            Reno

            I have the orange ones; received them as a wedding shower gift in 1972, if that helps you date them.

          • Tamara March 11, 2019 at 5:10 pm #

            Oh thank you, Reno! That is very helpful. Thank you for commenting.

            I was able to get ahold of and test several examples of vintage orange Tupperware pieces and they are also bad. I will be posting the results shortly.

            Tamara

      • Connie. TAYLOR March 11, 2019 at 12:43 pm #

        I have orange ones! Let me know!!!

      • Nina March 12, 2019 at 7:20 pm #

        I have the green ones….what about them?

  3. Laurie March 10, 2019 at 6:11 pm #

    This is absolute hogwash! Maybe some plastics contain lead but Authentic Tupperware never has. I suggest you contact Tupperware for an official statement before publishing such lies. Tupperware manufacturing standards exceed safety standards

    • Tamara March 10, 2019 at 6:35 pm #

      Hi Laurie,

      There were no safety standards for XRF detectable levels of Lead and Arsenic in kitchenware when these were made in the 1970s.

      Tamara

    • Denise March 11, 2019 at 7:01 am #

      Thank you! Someone with some sense! Tupperware has been food safe for generations. Don’t you think if this was a problem or poisonous it would have been found out before now and affected someone by now? Get out of here with this mess!

    • Tina Logan March 11, 2019 at 11:22 am #

      I completely agree with you. I posted this comment below: You mention multiple times on in a newly manufactured item.

      SO did you test a NEW Tupperware product? Or are you testing something that has been used for 50 years and had multiple things in them that could contaminate the test? Where are the scientific tests sheets? Are you a scientist working in a sterile environment for your testing purposes? What qualifications do you have to do this testing?

      • Susan March 14, 2019 at 8:48 am #

        I have tried to validate these findings, but apparently, she is the ONLY person reporting this. And all links on the blog take you back to her page – no external validation.

    • Mavis March 12, 2019 at 9:04 pm #

      I have not asked Tupperware about lead, but 10 years ago I called them to inquire about BPA. They said they couldn’t say for sure that it didn’t contain BPA and that if I was uncomfortable about it they suggested that I use something else. That was enough of a confirmation for me that it did.

    • Connie March 14, 2019 at 9:56 am #

      Many things have changed in manufacturing as companies discover how to do things differently and better for all. I suggest anyone really concerned contact Tupperware and let them give you complete information. As the world evolves we find many things that are now considered dangerous or toxic … that is when things change for the better. ‘Vintage items’ from many manufacturing companies have probably changed as I am sure Tupperware has. Perhaps that is why they say “This Is not your mother’s Tupperware”!

      • Tamara March 14, 2019 at 10:11 am #

        Thank you so much for this constructive and positive comment, Connie!

        Have a terrific day.

        Tamara

    • Melanie Boyles March 15, 2019 at 8:18 am #

      I totally agree. Tupperware issues an official statement that “unless you eat/ingest a full cup of the measuring set that is one of their older colored items (specifically from the 70s and early 80s era) you will not be exposed to enough lead to even harm a small animal such as rodent. As for the aresenic scare, a person would have to ingest 4 full sets to be at a risk. For people that have these items and have small children that chew on them, as always, Tupperware will replace that item. Once again it has to be an item such as measuring cups that are made from that specific era that contains a dye pigment. We have no idea who or why someone started this needless, harmful,and untrue report against Tupperware, but this is serious slander and legal action will be taken.” I urge you to tell all the facts and not put people into panic mode. As Tupperware stated I would beware of what I posted without ALL the facts.

      • Tamara March 15, 2019 at 9:33 am #

        Hello Melanie,

        As I said in response to your earlier comment, I am glad they have issued a public statement confirming my findings of the presence of toxicants (including Lead, Cadmium, Mercury and Arsenic) in their vintage products. I look forward to seeing it. If you have access to it please email it to me at: TamaraRubin@mac.com.

        Given there are current federal regulations about the levels of these toxicants that are considered unsafe and illegal, I do not agree with any statements that might diminish the concern for the levels that have been found in these products – as the levels found are (in most cases) many times the toxicity levels allowed by the current federal regulations intended to protect children (and humans in general) and government agencies across the world (not just the United States) agree that the levels of toxicants found are unsafe.

        My statements were neither untrue nor harmful, just factual.

        If in fact Tupperware issued a public statement (which I look forward to reading) my statements of my (very true) finding, served as an impetus for them to do the right thing to protect their customers by offering free replacement product in exchange for their toxic items. This is a terrific outcome for my work, and really – the ideal outcome.

        Tamara

  4. Janet March 10, 2019 at 6:27 pm #

    I am surprised at this. I was a TW dealer in the 70s and 80s. Much of the plastic used to mold these peices were manufactured by a petroleum based company outside my hometown in West Tx. The Tupperware home company based in Florida was always very helpful and transparent with any questions concerning product safety.

    • Tamara March 10, 2019 at 6:34 pm #

      Hi Janet,

      At the time they did not really have the technology for testing for toxicants that we do now. It is only in the past 15-20 years that hand-held XRF instruments for testing consumer goods have been available (and accurate), and even now in 2019 the instruments with the software specifically designed for testing consumer goods are rare (it is generally very difficult to find someone who has an instrument for this kind of testing as the instruments sell for about $50,000 new.) As a result it is possible they were not aware of the presence of these toxicants at these levels at the time of manufacture.

      Tamara

      • Karen March 11, 2019 at 6:12 pm #

        So you bought a $50,000 piece of machinery to test measuring cups?

        • Tamara March 11, 2019 at 6:24 pm #

          Hi Karen,

          No. I rent it – or borrow it.

          I WANT to buy a $50,000 instrument to test measuring cups, but I am not in a position to do so! 😉 LOL!

          Tamara

      • MaryCatherine March 11, 2019 at 6:21 pm #

        What about the colored bowls withe clear and colored lids?

  5. Brenda March 10, 2019 at 7:38 pm #

    I have a set of these from the 70’s but in white or clear. Are they also dangerous or does it have to do with the yellow coloring?

    • Tamara March 10, 2019 at 7:42 pm #

      Hi Brenda!

      I am not sure yet, since I have not tested all of the colors. I have some folks sending me examples of the other colors for testing and I will report back here on this post with links to the results (and will make sure to tag you in a comment too!)

      Thank you for commenting.

      Tamara.

      • Sandra March 11, 2019 at 11:26 pm #

        I have all kinds of Tupperware since the 70’s. Shouldn’t I be dead by now?

        • Tamara March 11, 2019 at 11:48 pm #

          Hi Sandra,

          Thank you for commenting.

          Chronic exposure to low-levels of toxicants on a daily basis won’t generally cause death. There are however quite a few symptoms and medical conditions that have been well studied and found to be associated with lead exposure that you may not be aware of (health conditions that many Americans suffer from for which the cause is often a “mystery” because blood lead testing is very rarely done in adults).

          This is a good post with more information about that: https://tamararubin.com/2017/01/what-is-the-impact-of-lead-poisoning-in-adults-including-college-age-students/

          Tamara

      • Brenda March 12, 2019 at 11:02 pm #

        Thanks so much.

  6. Mary March 10, 2019 at 8:55 pm #

    Do you know if other yellow TW products are toxic? I use the yellow colander all the time! It was purchased around the late 80’s.

    • Tamara March 10, 2019 at 10:54 pm #

      Hi Mary,

      I do not know for sure, but is very very possible. In my experience in testing vintage plastic items, the color is often a determining factor for Lead – not always, but often. I would expect other yellow ones of the same era to have a similar toxicant profile. Thank you for commenting. I hope to be testing and reporting on more examples soon.

      Tamara

      • Kimbra March 11, 2019 at 12:02 pm #

        Except, how would you ingest the lead from the colander? If you could the colander up and ate it, I could understand. Lead paint hurts kids when they eat flakes of paint or chew the paint off. I don’t see how Tupperware could be ingested.

  7. Christine Knox March 10, 2019 at 9:33 pm #

    Does Tupperware offer any kind of a warrantee on these products as I thought they had a lifetime warrantee n them of being toxic free of metals etc?

    • Tamara March 10, 2019 at 10:52 pm #

      Hi Christine,

      That’s a great question. Someone else mentioned that on Facebook. If that’s the case I think it would a blast to return these to the company En Masse, and ask them to do extensive testing on their vintage products and publicly alert the purchasers of all of these vintage items (on both ETSY and EBAY and through other means of contacting people with a public notice) of the related hazards. That would be an amazing and responsible thing for them to do (a virtual recall for products 40 years after they were made!) and would set an example for companies everywhere on how to do the right thing! 🙂 Here’s hoping!

      Tamara

  8. John TF March 10, 2019 at 10:01 pm #

    I’m confused by some of these comments. The FDA began enforcing limits on leachable lead in 1971. They certainly had ways of testing for this… And that’s the important thing here – whether it’s leaching or not.

    • Tamara March 10, 2019 at 10:48 pm #

      Hi John,

      This post is about total Lead content as decidable with an XRF. That is very different than leachable Lead.

      The CPSC regulations for children’s items (the most recent regulations on consumer goods and Lead, that are – in fact – the first regulatory standard that is approaching being reasonably protective of children’s health) has set standards that ALL consumer goods regulations SHOULD be set at.

      This is ESPECIALLY TRUE for consumer goods used in food preparation and food consumption. Why does a toy have to be under 90 ppm Lead in the coating (as detectable with an XRF instrument), but the dish a child eats dinner off of does not have that strict a standard? [Or the baby bottle for that matter – did you see my recent post about a Lead painted baby bottle – brand new? 2018 product!: https://tamararubin.com/2019/02/another-baby-bottle-with-lead-paint-nuk-glass-bottle-19900-ppm-lead-why-are-regulatory-agencies-ignoring-this-issue/

      The current limited federal standards around Lead in dishware (or any food serving product) and lead in cookware are woefully lax and inadequate – and barely enforceable (AND almost never enforced) given the current global economy for distribution of consumer goods (you can easily order product shipped directly to you from China via Amazon, and no one inspects those consumer goods that are shipped direct-to-consumer for toxicants violations!)

      Tamara

  9. MairC March 11, 2019 at 7:04 am #

    I have several sets of varying colors. red is my go to, as that’s a complete set. for the short period of time that say flour or sugar is in them, how much lead could one be infected with if it’s just a scoop and dump?

    I have so much vintage that is still in use, I would imagine most things aren’t up to today’s “standards”; although they are better made and made to last, unlike the junk of today.

    thanks for your research, I’d be interested in seeing the research on the other colors.

  10. Laura Selesky March 11, 2019 at 7:45 am #

    If they’re hazardous where are we supposed to dispose of them??

  11. Jennifer See March 11, 2019 at 7:57 am #

    My mom was a Tupperware lady back in the 70s-80s. She has the green measuring cups, yellow colander, and semi-transparent white canisters, plus all sorts of spoons and ladles and whatnot.I inherited the daffodil yellow flour and sugar canisters.

    Is it the yellow color or a widespread problem in the manufacturing of that era of Tupperware?

    • Tamara March 11, 2019 at 9:24 am #

      Hi Jennifer!

      Thank you for commenting. I don’t know yet if it is a wider-spread problem (beyond the vintage yellow of this era) – but I will be testing more soon and hope to have an answer to that question. With plastics (as with the vintage Fisher Price toys I have tested), the toxicants seem only to be present in certain colors (so that’s a theory and we can see if it will be supported with additional testing.) You can take a look at some of the vintage Fisher Price items I have tested here: https://tamararubin.com/category/vintage-fisher-price/

      Tamara

    • Sue K March 12, 2019 at 7:54 am #

      I worked for a paint company in the late 60s and early 70s, when manufacturers were forced to remove/reduce the lead levels in paint. Yellow colorant was the biggest problem when the lead was removed. You could not get yellow to cover anything anymore – and as it happened, I was trying to paint my kitchen yellow. Six layers later, I gave up and used a different color. I have no way of knowing for sure, but based on my paint experience, I’m thinking the yellow is going to be the real problem color.

      • Tamara March 12, 2019 at 9:12 am #

        Hi Sue!

        Thank you for your excellent comment! Yellow plastics have definitely been a problem (from that same era!)

        Tamara

  12. Elizabeth March 11, 2019 at 9:03 am #

    I have several TW storage containers and bowls I purchased back in 1989 or 1990 are they toxic also?

    • Tamara March 11, 2019 at 9:20 am #

      Hi Elizabeth,

      I haven’t tested enough examples of these vintage pieces to make any broader conclusions. I will be testing more soon though. Keep an eye here on this blog.

      Thank you for commenting!

      Tamara

  13. Rubal March 11, 2019 at 9:20 am #

    I quit using tupperware a long time ago because of the BPAs present in their products. It doesn’t suprise me that they would have other hazards in their products.

    • Marsha March 11, 2019 at 5:23 pm #

      As far as I have been told Tupperware has been BPA free for many, many years.

      • Tamara March 11, 2019 at 5:25 pm #

        Hi Marsha,

        Thank you for commenting. Yes – I heard this too. A Tupperware sales person mentioned that this has been since 2010.

        Tamara

  14. Teri March 11, 2019 at 9:30 am #

    How and where do u dispose of such items

    • Tamara March 11, 2019 at 10:57 am #

      Hi Teri!

      Thank you for commenting. Here’s my post about that (whether or not to throw out items that contain toxicants): https://tamararubin.com/2013/11/what-should-i-do-with-my-lead-contaminated-dishes-to-toss-or-not-to-toss/

      Legally, as a consumer, you are usually allowed to dispose of items like this in your household trash.

      Tamara

      • Jessica L Littlejohn-Knox March 11, 2019 at 1:37 pm #

        All Tupperware products are BPA free. And they have been for many years. I take this with a grain of salt. Arsenic is found in apple juice, but no one is stopping that from being produced. Tupperware has been above standards since day 1. Tamara I highly recommend you call tupperware with these findings and get some solid answers about your findings. There are over 100,000 people in the US and Canada making a living selling these top of the line products, and misleading posts like this are very hurtful.

        • Tamara March 11, 2019 at 5:29 pm #

          Hi Jessica,

          This information has no bearing on new products, it is only relevant to the old / vintage products (it looks like products from 40+ years ago). There were not relevant standards for toxicity testing at the time these were manufactured, so the fact that they followed the standards at the time has no bearing on whether or not they contain toxicants. This is the same for vintage Pyrex, vintage Corning, vintage Corelle, etc.

          Tamara

    • Melanie Boyles March 15, 2019 at 8:24 am #

      Tupperware released a statement that if it was truly a Tupperware item from the 70s early 80s era that contained dye pugments, that they would replace for free. I urge you to read Tupperware’s public statement first

      • Tamara March 15, 2019 at 9:26 am #

        Hi Melanie,

        Thank you for commenting.

        I received a few messages about this this morning (Friday, 3/15/2019) but have not been able to find their public statement online (I looked on their website and on their Facebook page.) Can you share it with me?

        I’m excited to hear they are confirming my test results by virtue of issuing this statement and taking responsibility in a way that is protective of children’s health – by offering free replacement items.

        The only part of this that is frustrating is that there is no year marking on the bottoms of any of the pieces I have found, so I don’t know how the average consumer can determine which years their pieces were made (I haven’t been able to find a guide to that online.) Any info on that point would also be much appreciated. My email address is TamaraRubin@mac.com.

        Tamara

  15. evlfred March 11, 2019 at 10:18 am #

    Could you please share more about your testing methodology? For instance, how many sets of these did you sample? Was the test preformed on the surface of the sample, which may have been exposed to lead or arsenic in the 40 years since they were manufactured? Were the results independently lab verified or otherwise peer reviewed? I’m sure you wouldn’t release results based on a single sample.

  16. Angie March 11, 2019 at 10:19 am #

    I have a set of these in green. I guess I need to stop using them

    • Tamara March 11, 2019 at 10:54 am #

      Hi Angie,

      Thank you for commenting. My advice would be to stop using them for now (perhaps just set them aside). I am working on collecting more samples of vintage Tupperware in different colors and will be reporting those test results here on this blog when I have them. It is possible that some colors contain these heavy metal toxicants when others do not. I have not done thorough testing yet for anything but the yellow (& specifically the vintage yellow measuring cups pictured here in this post.)

      Thank you again.

      Tamara

    • Dixie March 13, 2019 at 8:30 pm #

      I also have the green, and the measuring spoons and canister set that they came with, I use them all the time for sugar, flour and coffee

  17. Marcie March 11, 2019 at 10:21 am #

    Could you allow various liquids like water and vinegar to sit in the cup for 5 or 10 minutes and see if the liquid leaches?

    I get that kids shouldn’t chew on the damn things. I am just wondering if there is any realistic exposure from 30 years of using them.

    • Tamara March 11, 2019 at 10:52 am #

      Hi Marcie,

      Leach testing could be done. I think it is important do do leach testing on vintage/older products even if leach testing was done (and the products were found to be safe) at the time of manufacture. I don’t think leach testing at the time of manufacture is relevant with forty years of deterioration and wear on a product (if the testing was done at all). I discuss that here: https://tamararubin.com/topics/does-vintage-and-new-functional-pottery-and-dishware-have-unsafe-levels-of-lead/

      While the post linked above specifically discusses long-term leaching considerations in pottery, I would have the same considerations for vintage plastic.

      I personally don’t do any leach testing – but I think it would be great if the company would consider taking it up on their own (to do leach testing on their vintage products) – especially given the longevity of their product line and the huge devotion of their brand following.

      Thank you for commenting.

      Tamara

  18. Tina Logan March 11, 2019 at 11:15 am #

    You mention multiple times on in a newly manufactured item.

    SO did you test a NEW Tupperware product? Or are you testing something that has been used for 50 years and had multiple things in them that could contaminate the test? Where are the scientific tests sheets? Are you a scientist working in a sterile environment for your testing purposes? What qualifications do you have to do this testing?

    • Tamara March 11, 2019 at 11:55 am #

      Hi Tina,

      You can read more about the testing I do on the links below:

      One post: https://tamararubin.com/2016/12/ask-tamara-what-do-you-use-to-test-for-lead/
      Another post: https://tamararubin.com/xrf/
      A third post: https://tamararubin.com/2017/07/subscribe-in-support-of-my-advocacy-work-you-can-become-eligible-to-send-in-a-box-of-your-things-for-testing/

      Here’s a link to my certification as well: https://tamararubin.com/2017/09/certificate/

      Tamara

      Thank you for commenting.

      Tamara

      • Tina Logan March 11, 2019 at 12:15 pm #

        So you took a one day course, on how to use the Niton XRF analyizer and got a certificate, that isnt a qualification for scientific purposes, so I call BS on this whole article.

        • Steve March 11, 2019 at 6:25 pm #

          She has been performing this type of testing for years now. I’m fairly certain that learning how to use an instrument and performing routine analysis with it for years more than qualifies her to do this testing. Sterile conditions are not required for use of an XRF.

        • lab tech March 13, 2019 at 6:58 pm #

          An xrf scan is not the same thing as a lead test. If a xrf scan fails protocol calls for a lead then, substrate test or even a phthalates test. I’m with you Tina … I call BS too !!!

          • Tamara March 13, 2019 at 7:06 pm #

            Hello Athena,

            The XRF I use is specifically designed for testing consumer goods for Lead (and other metals), and the instrument is set up with software to do consumer goods testing accurately and effectively. Here is a piece from CBS This Morning about the work I did finding Lead in Fidget Spinners (back in 2017) – this might give you a better sense of the testing I do and the legitimacy of these test results: https://tamararubin.com/2017/11/cbs/

            Tamara

          • Denise Guin March 14, 2019 at 2:50 am #

            Yesssssssssssssssssssssssssss!

            As a Tupperware consultant and a kid who grew up with these products, I am totally offended by this post. This woman is no scientist.
            If my company’s products were poisoning people with lead all these years, we would have heard about it LOOOOOOONG ago!

            I am SO TIRED OF THIS POST!

          • Tamara March 14, 2019 at 9:43 am #

            Hi Denise,

            Here is my response to Susan earlier today. Hopefully it helps. Please know that you don’t need to follow this post. No one has asked you to, and you are invited to spend your time elsewhere.

            If you truly are curious about this inquiry read my response to Susan:

            Susan,

            If you look through the history of my work I have been a pioneer in this. Typically after I discover something then a local scientific organization or nonprofit will do a formal official study and confirm my results. Being the first person to discover something (using scientific methodology as I do) does not invalidate those discoveries.

            Please check out this link (from CBS This Morning) about my work discovering Lead in fidget spinners: https://www.cbsnews.com/news/fidget-spinners-high-levels-of-lead-consumer-advocacy-organization-report/

            Also here is a study that a scientist did about the concern for Lead in glassware, about 8 years after I initially reported the issue: https://tamararubin.com/2017/11/decorated-glassware/

            And here (more relevant to the Tupperware concern) is a study about toxicants found in vintage plastic toys, a study done about 7 years after I discovered this to be a concern: https://www.neha.org/sites/default/files/publications/jeh/JEH-JanFeb2015-Vintage-Toys.pdf

            Just because I am a pioneer in this work, does not make findings inaccurate or untrue. Please share that with the Tupperware community.

            Tamara

          • Denise Guin March 15, 2019 at 3:09 am #

            You are RIGHT! I don’t have to follow your post, but I want to stop this. I have contacted my Regional Director and The President of my company. Have you contacted Tupperware for an official statement???

            Don’t you think if our products were dangerous, we would have been called out LONG before now?
            MANY generations have grown up and OLD with our products and the are JUST FINE!

          • Tamara March 15, 2019 at 9:53 am #

            Hi Denise,

            Thank you for commenting.

            I think it is terrific that (apparently) Tupperware has issued some sort of public statement acknowledging my test results (and the presence of toxicants in their vintage products) and offering to exchange them for new toxicant-free products. I have not yet seen this public statement but would love to share it here on my blog. If you have a copy you could send me I would truly appreciate it. My email is TamaraRubin@mac.com.

            I did contact them via Facebook messenger – however have not heard back yet and have not been able to find this public statement posted anywhere online.

            In the meantime to see all of the posts I have up right now related to Tupperware, click this link (I currently have 6 posts with product test results up on the blog); https://tamararubin.com/category/tupperware/

            Tamara

            Tamara

  19. Miranda Benetti March 11, 2019 at 11:49 am #

    Thank you for your hard work and dedication to the subject if lead in products! I always enjoy your articles! 🙂 Keep up the good work, and thank you for everything you do!

    • Tamara March 11, 2019 at 11:51 am #

      Thank you for commenting Miranda!

      – Tamara

  20. Marilyn Reed March 11, 2019 at 12:50 pm #

    Mine are orange…and yes from the 70’s. I guess I can assume the Orange ones are also full of it? I also have a yellow Tupperware sieve.

  21. Lisa March 11, 2019 at 1:17 pm #

    Just thought. But gave you bothered to follow up with Tupperware on your findings? Maybe someone used that particular set of measuring cups in a shop of some sort that used those chemical which contaminated them to begin with and not be contaminated from the source. Seems irresponsible to put this out there with no back up data, especially in this day and age where Facebook posts go viral with no credibility.

    • Tamara March 11, 2019 at 5:24 pm #

      Hi Lisa,

      Thank you for commenting. The levels of Lead and arsenic found in these products could not be from (for example) contamination from Leaded water (etc.). Water is toxic for Lead in PPB (Parts Per BILLION), and it is not possible for that sort of exposure to imbue the product with toxicant levels at the levels found in the testing I did.

      Since I posted this original post, I found a brand-spanking-new-condition [with a tag bearing the words, “NEVER USED”(!)] set of vintage Tupperware dishes, in yellow, green, orange, brown and white plastics — and they too tested positive for similar levels of toxicants. I will be posting this results shortly.

      Tamara

  22. Eva March 11, 2019 at 3:23 pm #

    Wow, s if a mutl billion dollar company wouldn’t test their products, “because they wouldn’t spend $50,000 on the piece of equipment for such testing… who is to say THIS SET of yellow measuring cups haven’t been sitting in the dump somewhere and someone sent them to you.. HOW MANY have you actually tested to prove your findings? I would SUGGEST that you contact Tupperware with YOUR so called findings for them to prove YOU wrong. You may be getting yourself into a big lawsuit here.
    Oh and the person that said she’s gotten rid of all her Tupperware products because they have BPA in them….wow have YOU ever been misled on that one. Get your information straight and quit putting words in other peoples minds about the best PLASTIC Products ever made history.
    Again…your findings one one set of yellow Tupperware measuring cups doesn’t prove anything…especially since they’ve been sitting somewhere for 40 years.

    • Tamara March 11, 2019 at 5:15 pm #

      Hi Eva,

      I am sorry that you are so upset about these test results. Thank you for commenting.

      At the time these products were manufactured the technology of the $50,000 instrument did not exist in a form that was readily available to manufacturers.

      Since I posted this original post I have tested a full set of never used dishes in a range colors (orange, yellow, green, brown and white) with similar results. I was especially excited to see this set in brand-new never used condition (with a sign on it that said “never used.”) I will be posting those results shortly.

      Stand by.

      Tamara

  23. Bart March 11, 2019 at 3:33 pm #

    I have the white with gray speckles, are they also toxic?

    • Tamara March 11, 2019 at 5:11 pm #

      Hi Bart,

      Thank you for commenting. I haven’t tested those yet. I will be posting here on my blog when I do.

      Tamara

  24. Elaine March 11, 2019 at 5:36 pm #

    I have the white salt and pepper shakers I have used for 30 some years, are they safe?

  25. Kristie Keith March 11, 2019 at 6:12 pm #

    My mother has the yellow square looking container and lid. Are those okay. They are from the 70’s.

  26. Peg March 11, 2019 at 7:03 pm #

    Tamara, is it also an issue with the yellow measuring spoons and yellow cannisters from the 70’s? Thank you for your response! I have all 3 sets still and have grandchildren so will want to dispose of all if so!

  27. Mart March 11, 2019 at 8:23 pm #

    Can we send you stuff to test? I have a ton of vintage kitchen appliances. I collect them actually.

    And as for the people saying “ugh, how dare you say Tupperware has lead. What are your credentials? I’m flabbergasted. This is a lie”
    IGNORE THEM.
    The FDA/government also doesnt tell them they are being poisoned with basic table sugar. And they wouldnt believe it even if you told them.

  28. JRot March 11, 2019 at 8:35 pm #

    Tupperware is about to get manifold lawsuits for making these products with that much lead, arsenic and possibly other chemicals in that high of a concentration.

    And please, Tupperware, don’t tell us no one knew about it.

  29. Ann Fuller March 11, 2019 at 10:47 pm #

    How about the Tupperware measuring spoons from the same era. I will be getting rid of my measuring cups.& also Fisher Price garage & people that has seen 2 generations and in good condition was waiting for the next generation.

  30. Roberta Pettersson March 12, 2019 at 5:28 am #

    Great job! Glad someone NOT in the plastics industry or home party plastics sales teams is doing this testing. I see 2 almost identically worded angry posts… suspect cut and paste given to them.
    We ALL know or should know testing was not done, or was not done same way, or done with as good testing as today compared to 100/70/60/50/30 years ago. Things from the 70s are around 50 years old! Many an EDIBLE food or other products have been recalled because of NEW measurements, findings or acceptable levels. Allowable levels are constantly being decreased…. and there must be a reason. New research everyday is finding reasons/links to health issues. Why is BPA now such a scare but wasn’t 50 years ago?….. and why would “they have allowed this?” because we learn more/science learns more everyday. Just look at tobacco industry -what was allowed to inhale into your lungs. So this is completely believable and for me and my family, enough to add it to the little things I can do to make them safer.
    Maybe the leaching is “age related” but that doesn’t matter… the fact that it occurs does.
    “Are you a scientist?” Nope, and neither was Erin Brockovich. KEEP UP THE GOOD WORK!!! from a non relative, friend, acquaintance, supplier or contributor. ❤️

    • Tamara March 12, 2019 at 9:15 am #

      Roberta, thank you so much for this terrific comment!

      Tamara

  31. Pati Craven March 12, 2019 at 10:32 am #

    I have these and some other old tupperware . Is it just the yellow color or just the measuring cups in yellow. I have a strainer and a set of 3 storage containers in that bright yellow color

  32. Teresa March 12, 2019 at 12:06 pm #

    Hi Tamara,

    Have you posted your tests of rubberized modern plastic handles anywhere? You wrote that you found lead in them.

    Is there any concern for disposable plastic ware, like the red plastic cups people like to use at parties, or plastic spoons, forks, and knives ?

    Also, I’ve wondered a lot about paper plates and paper bowls that have printed patterns on them. Have you ever tested those items?

    • Tamara March 12, 2019 at 12:33 pm #

      Hi Teresa,

      Yes – there should be several examples of the rubberized handled kitchen utensils up on the site. Use the index to look at the different items I have tested, there are over 1,600 posts: https://tamararubin.com/2018/01/a-new-idea-an-index-for-leadsafemama-com/

      Disposable modern plastics are not generally a Lead-concern, and neither are modern paper plates (or similar picnic ware). My preferred choice is the wooden compostable ones (plus my bunny likes to chew on them too!): https://amzn.to/2F6PKBM (aflink).

      Thank you for commenting.

      Tamara

  33. Melanie March 12, 2019 at 4:40 pm #

    Oh good Lord. People have been using these since before I was born in ’55. And not one has had any problems from using these either.

    Amazing to me that there are so many things actually wrong in the world around us, and you pick TUPPERWARE?

    All the good causes taken? Had to scrounge for a cause to get your knickers in a twist about?

    Get a grip and grow up.

    • Tamara March 12, 2019 at 5:52 pm #

      Hi Melanie,

      I do consumer goods toxicity testing because my children have permanent brain damage from being acutely lead poisoned as babies.

      Tamara

      • Susy March 20, 2019 at 2:45 am #

        From Tupperware? What products do you blame for permanent brain damage from lead poisoning?

        I feel if you are going to print/post these warnings, then you also should post proof of people using Tupperware who have lead poisoning and how they are being treated.

        If a set of 45/50 year old measuring cups has been used, gone through thousands of dishwasher cycles, how could they possibly still be leaching lead or anything else? Your post seems to be lacking in follow up, and real life proof.

        JMO.

        • Tamara March 20, 2019 at 9:56 am #

          Hi Susy,

          Please read the full article, as your questions are answered in the article. Thank you.

          Tamara

    • Misty Henry March 12, 2019 at 8:52 pm #

      Not one that you’ve personally heard of. Regulations are made from the blood of those who have been harmed.

      New regulations or more strict standards are created because of work like Tamara’s that find concerns. That’s partly how ASTM functions: Continued research to find safer manufacturing processes.

      Since this particular article is about vintage products, the levels make sense. If these levels were the same for new products, then there would be even more concern to raise the issue with TW (or any company) so they have the opportunity to do better. As commented prior, BPA levels are one example where TW has done better (particularly because of the required regulations). If you’d like to send Tamara a 2017/2018/2019 variation, I’m sure she’d be happy to see what the results are (https://tamararubin.com/2017/07/subscribe-in-support-of-my-advocacy-work-you-can-become-eligible-to-send-in-a-box-of-your-things-for-testing/).

      Why shouldn’t we encourage companies to go above and beyond the base requirements of being compliant to keep their consumers actually safe?

      Full transparency, I am not an affiliate of Tamara’s, but I am a product safety consultant for artisans. We do go through similar requirements for things as “easy” as clothing an toys. I teach them the base regulations and how to go above and beyond to make sure their products can be truly safe and not just compliant.

  34. Fake News March 12, 2019 at 6:53 pm #

    Tamara, you are a crackpot spreading BS. If these products were really bad it would be all over the news. Get a life.

    • Tamara March 12, 2019 at 7:23 pm #

      Dear “Fake News”

      This one will be fun to read in the video of angry comments that I plan on making. Thank you for contributing to the crazy!

      Tamara

  35. Jasmine March 12, 2019 at 8:18 pm #

    If they are from 1970, and they tested positive for these high lead levels, how high was the lead to begin with?? Like I don’t think this is real y’all and if it is, I don’t think the lead in the plastic is harming you, because if it was my 100 year old grandma and her 95 year old husband would be dead from lead poisoning.

  36. Ann L. March 12, 2019 at 8:22 pm #

    Keep up the good work Tamara! Thanks to you I have gotten rid of my vintage Pyrex dishes and I’m so happy I don’t have any vintage Tupperware. I do have a set of Tupperware bowls I bought probably about 15-20 years ago, but I mostly use them for food storage in the fridge. I find your work so fascinating. That “Fake News” comment was hilarious! They’re THE Fake News to watch out for!!! LOL!!!! I found out about you about two weeks ago and have subscribed to your posts and even “I” have been accused of being “OBSESSED” with lead in products and “who cares” from a family member on Facebook. That comment did bother me, but I know these things are important for our kids and the environment and even ourselves. Keep on doing what you do best. I can’t wait to watch your documentary. Do you know if it will show on Netflix? Or where will it be shown? I’ll share it on Facebook when I find out. Thanks again for your hard work!

  37. Nadia March 12, 2019 at 8:37 pm #

    I don’t understand why people are getting so upset over your findings. I’m pretty sure they’ve never even heard of an XRF instrument for them to be asking if it was tested in a sterile environment. And one person saying grow up?!? Is Tamara acting immature by testing products that people send her?!? I would think saying get a grip and grow up is immature. I have a feeling this link was shared in a Tupperware group page and here come all the Tupperware soldiers saying how dare you! Lol So I’m guessing all these Tupperware soldiers are physicists, neurosurgeons, or people with crazy high IQs. That’s what low levels of lead exposure does… lowers IQ. It won’t kill you but are you as smart as you could’ve been, maybe… maybe not if you were exposed.

    If you don’t believe this to be true then keep it moving. But for those of us trying to protect our children, I appreciate you tamara.

    • Tamara March 12, 2019 at 8:47 pm #

      Thank you!

  38. Meredith March 12, 2019 at 11:24 pm #

    my mom is pitching whatever she can find from that time period. She pulled out our sugar container (brown) today to show me. Would you want to test it? It’s early/mid 80’s vintage. I’ll have her ship it to you and anything else she’s got if you want it. 🙂

    Can we start a gofundme for one of the fancy 50K XRF testers for you?? I mean it seems like a no brainer…. 😉

    • Tamara March 12, 2019 at 11:36 pm #

      Hi Meredith! Thank you so much.

      The GoFundMe that I have set up is ostensibly to help me buy my own instrument too, but it hasn’t raised enough and the $ raised so far has gone towards my legal team to date: http://www.GoFundMe.com/LeadSafeMama.

      Take a look at this brown one I posted tonight (it was the only color that was negative for toxicants) – if it is a similar color your mom might want to keep that piece until I test a few more examples to see if there are batch variations (although I would love to test more examples if she wants to send it anyway): https://tamararubin.com/2019/03/vintage-tupperware-brown-bowl-negative-for-lead-cadmium-mercury-and-arsenic/

      I have now posted 6 different vintage Tupperware examples on my blog, and only one (the brown one) did not have one or more of the main four toxicants I look for (Lead, Mercury, Cadmium or Arsenic.)

      If you have examples of other pieces that are different than the ones I have already tested (so I can test those and put the results on my blog) that would be terrific. The biggest problem with these things is that the exact year of manufacture cannot be determined by the piece, so I would definitely love to test some pieces where the owner knowns the year they bought them (so we can pinpoint the years of concern a little more specifically.)

      Thank you again for offering to help support my work in this way.

      My shipping address (if you have any pieces you want to send me for testing):
      Tamara Rubin
      Lead Safe Mama
      7933 SE 15th Avenue
      Portland, Oregon 97202

      – Tamara

  39. Jessica March 13, 2019 at 6:32 am #

    So glad you posted this. Hopefully now everyone will donate their Tupperware to Goodwill for me to scoop up! I love retro Tupperware, and it’s a much better product than the flimsy plastics manufactured today that you can’t ever get spaghetti sauce out of.

  40. Tracy March 13, 2019 at 7:46 am #

    Not ture
    Not true
    Not true

    • Jude March 13, 2019 at 12:16 pm #

      You are wrong, wrong, wrong

      • Tamara March 13, 2019 at 12:55 pm #

        🙂

  41. Mike Brigs March 13, 2019 at 3:06 pm #

    Quit supporting this bad science

  42. Juanita McSpadden March 14, 2019 at 10:05 am #

    Just dont put anything acidic in them, such as citrus or tomato products. This causes the lead to leach out into the food.

    • Tamara March 14, 2019 at 10:11 am #

      Hi Juanita,

      Thank you for commenting. My concern is also around the specific potential for them to be played with and used by children who might chew on them or otherwise put them in their mouths – especially given the levels found are so much higher than the current federal legal allowable limits for toys for children.

      Tamara

  43. The Modern Mindful Mom March 14, 2019 at 11:11 am #

    Love your work! I just threw away these exact measuring cups!

    I tried e-mailing you but the e-mail on your contact page came back as undeliverable?

    I wanted to let you know I featured you and linked back to your site in my most recent post (http://themodernmindfulmom.com/is-it-safe-for-babies-to-chew-on-keys/)

    Keep up the good work!

    • Tamara March 15, 2019 at 9:49 am #

      Thank you so much for commenting – and for sharing about my work.

      I will update the e-mail on my site. The correct email is: TamaraRubin@mac.com.

      Tamara

  44. The Modern Mindful Mom March 14, 2019 at 11:13 am #

    Love your work! I just threw away these exact measuring cups!

    I tried e-mailing you but the e-mail on your contact page came back as undeliverable?

    I just wanted to let you know I featured you and linked back to your site in my most recent post.

    Keep up the good work!

    • Tamara March 14, 2019 at 11:35 am #

      Thank you so much! Thank you for commenting too.

      My correct email (until my website gets updated!) is TamaraRubin@mac.com!

      Tamara

  45. M. A. Anderson March 15, 2019 at 11:16 am #

    Have you tested the crock pots form the 70’s? When I was working for a county agency several years ago, we had a number of lead testing kits mostly used to test toys. However , a few people brought crock pots (the old ones with orange or yellow or gree outside colors) , and they tested positive for lead. I threw mine out without testing.

    • Tamara March 15, 2019 at 2:15 pm #

      Hi yes, I have tested many crock pots – and the older they are the more lead they have (generally!)

      Here is the Crock Pot category on my blog: https://tamararubin.com/category/crockpot/

      Thank you for commenting.

      Tamara

  46. Judy Wood March 16, 2019 at 6:13 pm #

    How fast is this lead leching out. If you are just using them for the time of measurement, how does it have time to poison a person. Sounds a little like hysteria to me.

    • Tamara March 16, 2019 at 6:17 pm #

      Hi Judy,

      Thank you for commenting.

      From the post above: “While there may not be a single incident of Lead poisoning (or Arsenic poisoning for that matter) that can be traced to a kitchen item like this (because that is a difficult thing to track and study, given how many potential sources of toxicants can be found in our lives – in many things we use every day), with multiple toxicants present, at the levels found here, there is no defensible reason to save items like this and use them for food use purposes — when there are inexpensive toxicant-free alternatives readily available today in nearly every store that sells kitchen goods (and nearly every grocery store for that matter).

      The concern to consider is not so much “whether or not these specific cups might be poisoning you” but more along the lines of “what are the potential sources of environmental toxicity in our lives [sources that together can create an aggregate negative impact on our health] and what simple things we can do to eliminate possible exposure sources, giving our families (and especially our children and our grandchildren) a better chance at a healthier life.”

      Tamara

  47. Sandy March 16, 2019 at 9:27 pm #

    mine are beige and are from the mid 90’s, I believe… are they okay?

    • Tamara March 16, 2019 at 9:54 pm #

      Hi Sandy,

      Thank you for commenting. I haven’t yet tested any that are that color so I can’t say for sure. I have seen Lead in plastics products manufactured through at least the early 1990s – so I wouldn’t even want to make an educated guess without testing some examples first.

      Tamara

  48. s.topaz March 17, 2019 at 9:37 am #

    NONSENSE – I won’t even!!

    This woman’s claims are unproven. Her ‘tests’ are performed in her kitchen, which is not a sterile environment and are not done scientifically. She is a blogger out here on the net to make money, of which there are a dime a dozen. When people make these type of alarmist claims, it would be best to go by the wise old adage: “Don’t believe everything you hear and only half of what you see”. If this was indeed a true scientific fact, the population would have been made well aware of the dangers by now from reputable scientific laboratories.

    I would fact check all her ‘chicken little, sky-is-falling’ claims, before I swallow them hook, line and sinker.

    • Tamara March 17, 2019 at 10:32 am #

      Hi again “S. Topaz”.

      My tests are not done in my kitchen and the background surfaces that I use for testing are always tested first to confirm they are free of metals and won’t influence the test results at all.

      My total business income (looking at a cash basis) for 2018 was about < $12,000>, so while I would LIKE to make money for the work I do full time, with net income of “negative twelve thousand dollars” in one year, I am not quite there.

      Per the press release that I posted yesterday, your sentiment is a common refrain (“Wouldn’t we all know about this already?”). However please realize the reason I am the only one doing this research is NOT because this research is wrong or incorrect in any way, it is because no company benefits financially from doing this research: https://tamararubin.com/2019/03/press-release-toxicants-lead-cadmium-mercury-arsenic-found-in-vintage-tupperware/

      My work is not “a dime a dozen” there is, in fact, no other fully independent consumer watch dogs doing what I do. This is one of the reasons I have won two awards from the Federal government for my fully independent lead poisoning prevention advocacy work and consumer goods testing.

      I wonder why you are so angry about my findings that you feel the need to spam these multiple comments on my posts? Are you an antique dealer perhaps? Do you sell vintage stuff on e-bay? Curious.

      Tamara

  49. Andy March 18, 2019 at 11:48 pm #

    What are you actually testing? Do you swab the plastic? Soak it in a solvent? Are you doing headspace analysis? Are you grinding up the actual plastic? Curious to know.

  50. Barrett Fletcher March 19, 2019 at 1:03 am #

    You probably shouldn’t encourage children to chew on them. But if this isn’t the premier example of White Person Problem (considering the on going situation in Flint) I can’t imagine what would be.

  51. Susan Mester March 19, 2019 at 5:17 am #

    Hi Tamara thank you for the info. I have a marigold color Tupperware bowl and a maroon color that are probably ‘80’s not sure. Also I have 2 yellow colanders which I use often love the handles. Do these have lead?? Are the clear bowls safe?
    Thank you
    Susan

    • Tamara March 19, 2019 at 9:55 am #

      Hi Susan, I haven’t texted those yet that I am aware of (those colors) – although I don’t have the names for all the colors. Check back periodically at this link to see any new Tupperware posts I share. I will be posting some more today: https://tamararubin.com/category/tupperware/

      That link will take you to a list view of all my posts related to Tupperware.

      Thank you for commenting.

      Tamara

  52. Nohline March 19, 2019 at 5:50 pm #

    My family and I have never eaten these items but used them often in the kitchen; so assuming you’re right in your analysis, what do you propose we do with this stuff? Do we donate it to goodwill; do we dump the toxins into the trash and garbage dump; do we put it out for recycling?

    I think this is a lot of hot air without solutions.

  53. Sara March 19, 2019 at 6:29 pm #

    I recently passed down my Tupperware kid sized kitchen set to my daughter to play house with. The dishes are brown, yellow, orange and green. From the 1980’s. She doesn’t eat real food from them. Would they have the same composition as the ones that you have already tested? Should I get rid of them?

  54. A Tupperware Lover March 19, 2019 at 8:07 pm #

    I’m sorry but trying to make a name for yourself by slandering a large corporation isn’t the way to, lady. If you were a true science professional, you would know that a proper experiment would not be entirely made up of variables. In this case, you would need a brand new set of cups that never came in touch with anything other than the factory equipment and employees and you do not. You tested the same product over and over… of course you got the same results. A product that has been out on the open for decades and has come in contact with many things. For all we know, you could have used them consistently to measure something containing lead and/or arsenic for most of that time and, of course, it would have absorbed into the plastic.
    Please leave science to the true professionals.

    • Tamara March 19, 2019 at 8:39 pm #

      Hi there,

      After I published this original post I found a new unused set of bowls and purchased them and tested them (new unused but from the 1970s, same era) and the results were the same. Click here to see those posts:https://tamararubin.com/category/tupperware/

      I made a name for myself long before testing Tupperware in 2019 ;-). I was on the Today Show in 2008. I was on CBS This Morning in 2017, and countless other news stories in between prior to this.

      My focus is not Tupperware, my focus is testing consumer goods of all kinds for Lead in an effort to help parents make informed choices for their families.

      I have over 1,600 posts here with test results – just a handful are Tupperware related. I have found Lead in newly manufactured baby bottles, in fidget spinners, in toys, in dishes, in lipstick – you name it. If you are interested in knowing which items in your home may have lead, and which may be lead-free, you can start with the Index for my site: https://tamararubin.com/2018/01/a-new-idea-an-index-for-leadsafemama-com/

      Thank you for commenting and please let me know if you have any additional questions after you take a look at those links.

      Tamara

  55. Julie Blaha March 19, 2019 at 8:18 pm #

    Thank you so much for doing this work ~ at your own expense, too. I have orange measuring cups and spoons. I used them to bake for my grandchildren, but not anymore. I don’t understand how people are upset that you are giving us valid information about a possible danger. They don’t have to pay attention to lead levels in their kitchens if they choose not to. To imply that you have not done enough because you haven’t tested the leach levels seems ludicrous to me. If they want that information, I suggest they test it themselves. I am so appreciative to have this information. Thank you again.

    • Tamara March 19, 2019 at 8:33 pm #

      Thank you so much Julie!

      On point! Exactly. You 100% get it.

      It’s a trying experience. But I try to be patient with everyone. Each #NegativeNelly can be turned around if you appeal honestly to their concerns and try to answer their questions with the specific information they request – which I try to do.

      I have been getting a LOT of hate e-mails in the past week. I respond with the story of my children’s poisoning and why I think there is a concern with these products (and why I think there is a need for corporate accountability for historic misdeeds) and those people I e-mail almost always turn around (at least a bit) to seeing the concern and getting the potential impact on their family.

      I think it’s so funny that Snopes wrote an article today that at first glance appears to discredit my work, but with a solid thorough read it clearly 100% supports my findings. https://tamararubin.com/2019/03/i-made-it-to-the-front-page-of-snopes-again-4th-time-this-time-the-article-is-about-me-and-my-work-not-about-something-i-tested/

      If only a small portion of the people who read about this really truly understand the concern (for the first time, in a new way), then a difference has been made and that’s all that matters.

      Tamara

  56. Sarah March 19, 2019 at 9:53 pm #

    Serious question. Are these heavy metals and chemicals in the plastic addicting? I grew up using tupperware and playing with tuppertoys. Not sure if it’s just nostalgia or if the cups make water taste better, but to me I feel like water tastes best in tupperware cups. There is a distinct taste to the cups.

  57. William Bumper March 20, 2019 at 4:02 am #

    I may have missed it in the comments or on your site, but what instrument were you using to verify this and do you display your data results? It would be nice to have this information in order to help validate what you are writing.

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