THIS is my NEW FAVORITE PAN (and that’s before I have even used it yet, LOL!)

SolidTeknics Made In USA frying pan (2018).

THIS is my NEW FAVORITE PAN (and that's before I have even used it yet, LOL!)

A friend in Australia had this shipped this to me to test. I am going to start this post by sharing the XRF results, and then will share a list of all the reasons I think this pan is a wonderful “Safer Choice” (from both a non-toxic perspective, a design perspective – and other reasons, too)! Please read the post in full, scrolling past each of the images.

THIS is my NEW FAVORITE PAN (and that's before I have even used it yet, LOL!)

NOTE: I do not – yet – have an affiliate link for this company or this product.

When tested with an XRF instrument the pan pictured had the following readings:
[XRF Materials Type Noted: “Metal-430/40” when tested in “Consumer Goods” mode.]

Test One:
(180 seconds / 3 minutes)

  • Lead (Pb): Non-Detect / Negative
  • Cadmium (Cd): Non-Detect / Negative
  • Arsenic (As): Non-Detect / Negative
  • Mercury (Hg): Non-Detect / Negative
  • Barium (Ba): Non-Detect / Negative
  • Chromium (Cr): 137,300 +/- 600 ppm
  • Antimony (Sb): Non-Detect / Negative
  • Selenium (Se): Non-Detect / Negative
  • Tin (Sn): 108 +/- 31 ppm
  • Copper (Cu): 1,631 +/- 167 ppm
  • Nickel (Ni): 2,056 +/- 240
  • Iron (Fe): 851,600 +/- 1,200 ppm
  • Vanadium (V): 598 +/- 101 ppm
  • Magnesium (Mn): 4,698 +/- 664 ppm

Please continue reading after image.

THIS is my NEW FAVORITE PAN (and that's before I have even used it yet, LOL!)

Test Two:
(60 seconds)

  • Chromium (Cr): 159,700 +/- 1,900 ppm
  • Tin (Sn): 109 +/- 37 ppm
  • Copper (Cu): 1,282 +/- 187 ppm
  • Nickel (Ni): 1,822 +/- 281
  • Iron (Fe): 830,600 +/- 2,300 ppm
  • Magnesium (Mn): 4,691 +/- 788 ppm
  • Metals not listed here were non-detect.

Multiple XRF tests were done in different spots, and all were in similar range fas the above two sets of test results (although some readings were “Non-Detect” for Tin and Vanadium.)

Please continue reading after the images.

THIS is my NEW FAVORITE PAN (and that's before I have even used it yet, LOL!)

Here’s what I like about this pan:

  • There are NO grommets (no attachment points for the handle). Many stainless pans have grommets attaching the handle and those grommets are usually made of a different metal than the pan and (in my experience testing hundreds of different pans) often test positive for Lead when tested with an XRF instrument.
  • Bucking the “fashion trend”, there is no toxic coating nor decorative elements (made of additional materials) on the pan (non-stick, enamel, brass or otherwise).
  • The pan (including the handle) is made of one solid contiguous piece of metal, so there is no concern of eventual possible de-lamination / separation of dissimilar metals, due to overheating, corrosion, etc. Many other brands of pans have handles made out of a combination of materials (even when the pan is advertised as “solid stainless steel”). Those other materials used for handles often contain Leaded components. [Especially trendy right now is Leaded-brass accent handles, LINK.]
  • The type of metal used for this particular pan (ferritic stainless steel*) is very low-Nickel, similar to many of the stainless pans from Ikea. While I don’t personally have a concern for Nickel in my stainless pans, some people do, especially if they have been diagnosed as having an allergy/sensitivity to Nickel.
  • The design is adorable! I love the little map of the United States in the handle. 🙂 I also love the balance and weight of the pan.
  • The pan has a “multi-century” warranty! This is amazing (and fun)!
  • The pan does not need seasoning.
  • The pan is Made in the USA (by a division of a company that was originally started in Australia.)
  • The pan is stamped with the month and year of manufacture for batch traceability (I think this is incredibly responsible of the company to have the foresight to do that!)

Please continue reading below to see the one (single) concern I have about the product… 

THIS is my NEW FAVORITE PAN (and that's before I have even used it yet, LOL!)

I have just one concern about the pan, and that is the language used to describe the type of stainless steel used. Please read the following:

*Without getting too technical, there are a LOT of different stainless steel alloys out there, grouped into four basic categories: “Austenitic”, “Ferritic”, “Martensitic”, and “Duplex” (with many different alloys within each of these basic groups — each one defined by the specific alloying elements, and the percentages of each one present in the particular “recipe”). In the event that this subject interests you, you can read more about that HERE.

In the case of these pans, the alloy used is a ferritic stainless steel (430/40).

The lay-language being used to describe this specific material is “non-Nickel” stainless steel, however it is important to note that a “non-Nickel” stainless alloy is not necessarily literally “Nickel-free”.

What this language is meant to convey is that the stainless sub-type used for this pan is not a Nickel-based stainless alloy. Said another way: Nickel is not a primary nor significant component of the alloy.

MOST stainless cookware items I have tested are made of one of the more common high-Nickel-content/”Nickel-based” alloys (most commonly, 304 stainless) – which typically contains between 82,000 and 90,000 parts per million (ppm) Nickel. [LINK] By contrast, this particular pan that was sent to me is approximately 2,000 ppm Nickel. this means it is just about 0.2% Nickel or less, and thus legitimately falls within the category commonly referred to as a “non-Nickel” stainless.

My concern is that consumers (especially American consumers) will likely easily be confused — believing/thinking that “non-Nickel” stainless means “Nickel-free“, and this is not always the case (as with this particular pan from this company pictured here – which was made in September of 2018.)

This concern is compounded by the name of the company / product-line: “nöni”, which I am assuming stands for “Non-Nickel” (referring to the non-Nickel-based stainless alloy)!

All that said, I think this is still a terrific choice for a pan!

Additional images of the pan and packaging are below. Here’s a link where you can buy this pan. [This is not an affiliate link and I am getting no commission for making this referral at this time]: LINK.

Note to the manufacturers (if they read this post): If you are truly wanting these pans to be Nickel-free, please look into the metal alloys used by Ikea for their pots and pans (many of which are fully Nickel-free) — and you may also want to consider doing XRF testing (by batch) in advance of manufacturing each batch (just to confirm the levels of the various component metals in the stainless.) Truly Nickel-free stainless alloys are available.

As always, please let me know if you have any questions.

Thank you for reading and for sharing my posts.

Tamara Rubin
#LeadSafeMama

Here are the features of these pans as listed on a website that is selling them:

THIS is my NEW FAVORITE PAN (and that's before I have even used it yet, LOL!) THIS is my NEW FAVORITE PAN (and that's before I have even used it yet, LOL!)  THIS is my NEW FAVORITE PAN (and that's before I have even used it yet, LOL!) THIS is my NEW FAVORITE PAN (and that's before I have even used it yet, LOL!) THIS is my NEW FAVORITE PAN (and that's before I have even used it yet, LOL!)   THIS is my NEW FAVORITE PAN (and that's before I have even used it yet, LOL!)  THIS is my NEW FAVORITE PAN (and that's before I have even used it yet, LOL!) THIS is my NEW FAVORITE PAN (and that's before I have even used it yet, LOL!) THIS is my NEW FAVORITE PAN (and that's before I have even used it yet, LOL!) THIS is my NEW FAVORITE PAN (and that's before I have even used it yet, LOL!) THIS is my NEW FAVORITE PAN (and that's before I have even used it yet, LOL!)

2 Responses to THIS is my NEW FAVORITE PAN (and that’s before I have even used it yet, LOL!)

  1. Cheryl December 26, 2018 at 9:24 pm #

    Hi Tamara!

    Nice article! Now I have pan envy.
    Unfortunately the cost of this pan is out of reach for many people.
    I always try to cook with stainless steel pans.
    Most stainless steel pans many brands have the rivets attachments (I guess that is what you mean by grommets?). So do kitchen knives/ steak knives etc- most have rivets. In fact rivets are ubiquitous to almost all sort of cookware.
    Most people can’t afford XRF testing for all pans and pots they buy.
    Many of us don’t live where there is ikea- I know you recently tested a pot from ikea with no lead in the rivets.
    Are you suggesting that we shouldn’t buy anything that is riveted/ welded due to possible lead content in the rivets (as far as I am aware rivets used in cookware generally are aluminum alloy or stainless steel- so I wonder where the lead would come from).
    Could you post examples of lead in the rivets/ joints you tested? Or give an idea of how much lead?
    This is concerning as there is a 100% possibility that food will be cooked on contact the rivets in pans and pots.
    If not then the statement can be quite alarmist and anxiety provoking for I guess everyone who owns any cookware or utensils really.

    ThAnk you,
    Cheryl

    • Tamara December 26, 2018 at 11:36 pm #

      Hi Cheryl,
      In my work I try to give people information so they can make informed decisions for their homes. I test things people send me to test. Someone sent me this pan to test. I would never buy something like this myself. I don’t even have money for groceries most days, let alone expensive cookware. However if you look through my posts you will see lots of examples of inexpensive lead-free options. My Lead Safe Mama Amazon Store also has a lot of inexpensive options for people. In general I recommend using a mix of Stainless Steel, Cast Iron, Clear Glass and Bamboo. I’m not ever trying to be alarmist – just to provide very specific information within a specific range (presence of Lead, Cadmium, Arsenic and Mercury.) I don’t really have a problem with Nickel in Stainless, but some people do – so this pan solves that problem to some degree, but so do the Ikea ones and Ikea ones cost $10 or $20 each and are low-Nickel and Lead-free. Ikea does mail order too – so you don’t need to live near one. The rivets that are often leaded are the pot-metal ones (usually aluminum based) that look dull gray (and they don’t touch the inside of the pot / food surface). I don’t ever recall testing knife rivets that were positive for Lead (although some of the yellow ones are positive for Mercury and Arsenic – but not Lead.)
      T

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