1984 Vintage Fisher Price Little People Yellow School Bus: 2,953 ppm Lead + 344 ppm Arsenic. Did you have this one?


Vintage Fisher Price Little People Yellow School Bus Toy, c. 1984.
Yellow & Red Plastic.

To see more vintage Fisher Price items I have tested, click here.

The XRF test results for this exact item (pictured above) are as follows:

Yellow Plastic of School Bus:
(tested for a minimum of 60 seconds)

  • Lead (Pb): 2,953 +/- 59 ppm
  • Cadmium (Cd): Non-Detect/Negative
  • Mercury (Hg): Non-Detect/Negative
  • Arsenic (As):  344 +/- 37 ppm
  • Chromium (Cr): 1,106 +/- 85 ppm
  • Zinc (Zn): 239 +/- 15 ppm
  • Iron (Fe): 80 +/- 23 ppm
  • Titanium (Ti): 1,548+/- 262 ppm
  • If a metal is not listed it was not detected by the XRF instrument.

Orange Wheels Of School Bus:

  • Only metal detected: Iron (Fe): 28 +/- 12 ppm

White Eyeballs Of  School Bus:

  • Lead (Pb): 16 +/- 5 ppm
  • Barium (Ba): 134 +/- 83 ppm
  • Bromine (Br): 5 +/- 2 ppm
  • Zinc (Zn): 480 +/- 21 ppm
  • Copper (Cu): 92 +/- 17 ppm
  • Iron (Fe): 132 +/- 27 ppm
  • Titanium (Ti): 13,500 +/- 500 ppm

Test over metal grommet on hood of bus:

  • Lead (Pb): 2,451 +/- 90 ppm
  • Arsenic (As): 210 +/- 63 ppm
  • Chromium (Cr): 184 +/- 39 ppm
  • Selenium (Se): 207 +/- 33 ppm
  • Zinc (Zn): 33,700 +/- 600 ppm
  • Copper (Cu): 194 +/- 63 ppm
  • Nickel (Ni): 38 +/- 22 ppm
  • Iron (Fe): 93,200 +/- 1,300 ppm
  • Titanium (Ti): 337 +/- 123 ppm

*The amount of lead that is considered toxic in the substrate (base material) of a newly manufactured item made today and intended for use by young children is anything 100 ppm lead or higher.

  • Vintage toys were not regulated for total lead content as detectable with an XRF.
  • Advice: don’t let your children play with vintage toys, as there is really no way for you to know (at home) if these items are toxic or not.
  • A LeadCheck swab (or similar reactive agent swab test to test for lead) will not generally work on an item like this. That type of testing methodology was invented and designed primarily for detecting lead in painted surfaces (like house paint.) [What can I test with a LeadCheck swab? Click here.]

To learn more about XRF testing, click here.

As always, thank you for reading and for sharing my posts!

Please let me know if you have any questions.

Tamara Rubin
#LeadSafeMama

 

Click the image below to see the XRF test results of another popular vintage Fisher Price toy!
[Same color vintage plastic but COMPLETELY DIFFERENT test results!]

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