Pyrex® Glass Measuring Cup (c. 1994): Positive for 6,253 ppm Lead in the red outside markings.

Pyrex Glass Measuring Cup (c. 1994) Exterior Red Painted Lines: 6,253 ppm Lead

20+ year old Pyrex® measuring cup.
Purchased new c. 1994

When tested with an XRF instrument the red markings on the outside of this cup were positive for Lead at the following level:

  • Lead (Pb): 6,253 ppm

For reference, the amount of lead that is considered toxic in an item intended to be used by children is anything 90 ppm or higher (dishware is not regulated in the same way for the presence of Lead).

While it can be argued that it is “only” on the exterior and thus “non-leaching”, this is a very high amount of Lead — especially considering it is both a relatively modern item, and one intended for heavy/daily use in household food preparation activities. [I would also point out that the user – whether adult or child – can be reasonably expected to come into frequent direct contact with the painted markings in normal usage.]


Tamara, how can I tell if my Pyrex® glass measuring cup has lead or cadmium?
If you would like to make an educated guess as to whether or not a particular Pyrex® glass measuring cup may have Lead (Pb) or Cadmium (Cd) in the writing on the outside, your best option is to compare the typeface of the writing to the examples here on this site. If your cup’s typeface/”font” is the same style and color as one pictured, it is likely of the same vintage, and will also likely have similar Lead (Pb) and Cadmium (Cd) levels as this typical example.

To see more Pyrex® glass measuring cups I have tested, Click Here 

To see all types (different brands) of glass measuring cups I have tested, Click Here.

Fortunately There are many lead-free options out there.  For guidelines to help you choose a safer measuring cup, Click Here! [Prices listed below are from when this post was originally written and they may have changed since then.]

Please share and browse the photo library here (click on the #XRFTesting tag above) to see items I have personally tested that have tested both positive and negative for lead.

To learn more about XRF Testing & the potential implications of lead in cookware click HERE and HERE.

Read more about lead-in-Pyrex® here.

As always please let me know if you have any questions.

Thank you for reading and for sharing my posts.

Tamara Rubin
#LeadSafeMama

*Amazon links are affiliate links. If you purchase something after clicking on one of my affiliate links I may receive a small percentage of what you spend at no extra cost to you. Thank you for supporting my advocacy work in this way!

Pyrex Glass Measuring Cup (c. 1994) Exterior Red Painted Lines: 6,253 ppm Lead

4 Responses to Pyrex® Glass Measuring Cup (c. 1994): Positive for 6,253 ppm Lead in the red outside markings.

  1. bmommyx2 June 12, 2017 at 2:34 pm #

    I have one of these at home, is there a way to test & see if it’s safe? thanks

    • Tamara June 13, 2017 at 2:55 pm #

      Sometimes these will test positive with the swabs from LeadCheck BUT if you take a look at the shape of the logo on yours and the shape of the logos on the various ones I have tested that will be a good indicator as to whether or not they have lead (if they have the same logo shape or not – the “P” is distinctly different on the unleaded vs. the leaded ones.)

      • Brianna Gray October 26, 2017 at 9:09 am #

        So I have a quick question, if you don’t mind. I have my measuring cups in a pile (all of which contain lead! They tested positive with the lead check, and they have the old ‘P’)… However I have a “newer” Pyrex measuring dish. It has the newer ‘P’ on it… It looks like the outer is fading so I am wondering, is that okay? It says unleaded vs leaded with the ‘P”s, and I’m interested because I wonder if my.lead swab is red from the paint color or lead.
        I hope that makes sense.

  2. Richard Bergstrom July 11, 2017 at 10:47 am #

    Tamara:

    This is Rich, Did the people from Pyrex respond to your test results?

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