Vintage Corelle Plate With Crazy Daisy Spring Blossom Green Edge: 15,200 ppm Lead [90 is unsafe for kids] + Cadmium

Corelle Plate With Crazy Daisy Spring Blossom Green Border Pattern: 15,200 ppm Lead + Cadmium

To see more Corelle pieces I have tested, Click HERE.

Vintage Corelle Plate With Green Crazy Daisy / Spring Blossom Green Border.


This green painted decorative border of this Corelle plate was positive for a very high level of Lead. Based on stories my readers have shared with me (since first posting this piece), the plates with this design were most likely manufactured around 1980. To see the full XRF readings for this exact plate, scroll down.

To learn more about XRF testing, Click HERE.

As a mother of Lead-poisoned children and as an environmental activist, I have taken the stand that there is no place for Lead on our dining tables. None at all.

It literally just takes a microscopic amount of Lead to poison a child (or any human for that matter) and there is NO ONE studying the potential impact that eating off of Leaded vintage dishware has on the users (because no corporation stands to benefit financially from such a study). Consequently, we need to err on the side of prudence, and proactively remove all potential sources of Lead exposure from our homes ourselves, starting with our kitchens.

For a pretty Lead-free & Cadmium-free option, Click HERE.*

These particular dishes tested positive for 15,200 ppm Lead. For context; the amount of Lead that is considered toxic in a newly manufactured item “intended for use by children” is anything 90 ppm Lead or higher in the paint or coating, and anything 100 ppm Lead or higher in the substrate. Dishes (modern or vintage) are not considered to be items “intended for use by children”, and thus are not regulated for total lead content in the same way as toys and other similar children’s items (unless they are dishes expressly manufactured, marketed and sold as baby dishes after 2010.]

Related: What should I do if my dishes are positive for high levels of lead? Click HERE.

Tests were done for at least 60 seconds each, using an XRF instrument. The XRF instrument used in the testing is a scientific instrument specifically designed and intended for testing consumer goods for Lead and other metals.

I took some of the photos against a white background cloth and others against green, to give you a better sense of the colors for this particular dish.


Corelle Plate With Crazy Daisy Spring Blossom Green Border Pattern: 15,200 ppm Lead + Cadmium

Green Decorative Edge / Food Surface (image above):

  • Lead (Pb): 15,200 +/- 400 ppm
  • Cadmium (Cd): 108 +/- 12 ppm
  • Mercury (Hg): Non-Detect / Negative
  • Arsenic (As): Non-Detect / Negative
  • Barium (Ba): Non-Detect / Negative
  • Chromium (Cr): 318 +/- 110 ppm
  • Antimony (Sb): Non-Detect / Negative
  • Selenium (Se): Non-Detect / Negative
  • Zinc (Zn): 775 +/- 62 ppm
  • Copper (Cu): 111 +/- 45 ppm
  • Nickel (Ni): 1,034 +/- 112 ppm
  • Iron (Fe): 458 +/- 142 ppm
  • Bismuth (Bi): Non-Detect / Negative
  • Vanadium (V): Non-Detect / Negative
  • Titanium (Ti): 5,722 +/- 294 ppm
  • Zirconium (Zr): 2,901 +/- 91 ppm
  • Platinum (Pt): 266 +/- 96 ppm
  • Cobalt (Co): 1,163 +/- 134 ppm

Corelle Plate With Crazy Daisy Spring Blossom Green Border Pattern: 15,200 ppm Lead + Cadmium

Plain White Center of Plate / Food Surface:

  • Lead (Pb): Non-Detect / Negative
  • Cadmium (Cd): Non-Detect / Negative
  • Mercury (Hg): Non-Detect / Negative
  • Arsenic (As): Non-Detect / Negative
  • Barium (Ba): Non-Detect / Negative
  • Chromium (Cr): Non-Detect / Negative
  • Antimony (Sb): Non-Detect / Negative
  • Selenium (Se): Non-Detect / Negative
  • Zinc (Zn): Non-Detect / Negative
  • Copper (Cu): Non-Detect / Negative
  • Nickel (Ni): Non-Detect / Negative
  • Iron (Fe): 491 +/- 141 ppm
  • Bismuth (Bi): Non-Detect / Negative
  • Vanadium (V): 99 +/- 27 ppm
  • Titanium (Ti): 137 +/- 35 ppm

To learn more about the concern for Cadmium (Cd), which is a known carcinogen, Click HERE.

Corelle Plate With Crazy Daisy Spring Blossom Green Border Pattern: 15,200 ppm Lead + Cadmium

Logo Area (Back of Plate – image above):

  • Lead (Pb): 95 +/- 20 ppm
  • Cadmium (Cd): Non-Detect / Negative
  • Mercury (Hg): Non-Detect / Negative
  • Arsenic (As): Non-Detect / Negative
  • Barium (Ba): 1,890 +/- 434 ppm
  • Chromium (Cr): Non-Detect / Negative
  • Antimony (Sb): Non-Detect / Negative
  • Selenium (Se): Non-Detect / Negative
  • Zinc (Zn): Non-Detect / Negative
  • Copper (Cu): 63 +/- 38 ppm
  • Nickel (Ni): Non-Detect / Negative
  • Iron (Fe): 275 +/- 86 ppm
  • Indium (In): Non-Detect / Negative
  • Bismuth (Bi): Non-Detect / Negative
  • Vanadium (V): Non-Detect / Negative
  • Titanium (Ti): Non-Detect / Negative
  • Cobalt (Co): Non-Detect / Negative

As always, please let me know if you have any questions. Thank you for reading and for sharing my posts!

Tamara Rubin
#LeadSafeMama

*Some links are Amazon affiliate links. If you purchase something after clicking on one of my affiliate links I may receive a small percentage of what you spend at no extra cost to you. Thank you for supporting my independent consumer goods testing in this way!

Corelle Plate With Crazy Daisy Spring Blossom Green Border Pattern: 15,200 ppm Lead + Cadmium

44 Responses to Vintage Corelle Plate With Crazy Daisy Spring Blossom Green Edge: 15,200 ppm Lead [90 is unsafe for kids] + Cadmium

  1. Judy November 20, 2018 at 10:27 am #

    I have a whole set. Is corel taking these back?

    • Tamara November 20, 2018 at 10:31 am #

      It couldn’t hurt to ask them!!! 🙂
      Per this post: https://tamararubin.com/2013/11/what-should-i-do-with-my-lead-contaminated-dishes-to-toss-or-not-to-toss/

    • GlassMechanic November 27, 2018 at 9:47 am #

      I worked st the corelle plant for 9 years. Trust me when I say. That’s an older plate and older design. Going back 30 or 40 years of course everything was testing high for lead. The newer paints are lead free. Stop the scare tactics just to push your agenda. This factory is part of a sleepy southern Tier town, and a main source of income.

      • Tamara November 27, 2018 at 10:17 am #

        Sharing XRF readings on specific dishes is “information” not “scare tactics” – I fully encourage and support folks buying Lead-free new Corelle! I love the stuff. As a mother of lead poisoned children I believe there is no place in our homes or kitchens (especially) for items with high levels of lead. Check out this post: https://tamararubin.com/2016/12/dishes/

        • Jen December 29, 2018 at 7:40 pm #

          I challenge the person who posted the article originally to have the plate tested for themself. I don’t believe that the plate tested for lead. I would like to see the results myself as well.

          • Tamara December 29, 2018 at 8:11 pm #

            I do the testing myself. I am trained and certified in using a scientific instrument (for field use), the same instrument used by the United States Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) to find toxicants in consumer goods. The findings are accurate and replicable. Here’s my training certificate: https://tamararubin.com/2017/09/certificate/ – the results posted here ARE the exact results from my testing.

      • Sarah November 28, 2018 at 11:02 am #

        Yes, the plates are old. But I owned this plate until I saw Tamara’s post yesterday. My five year old daughter always wanted to eat on it because it had pretty flowers.

        If Corelle knows that the old dishes had lead, they should publish that information.

      • carrie December 11, 2018 at 2:51 pm #

        My family still uses these plates as we did when I was a kid. Just because it’s old doesn’t mean it isn’t used. The owner of this site highly recommends a different style Corelle. What agenda do you think she has?

        • Rebecca December 30, 2018 at 6:35 am #

          Safety and general knowledge. That seems like the agenda here!
          Do with the information what you will-but I certainly won’t let my children eat off plates that have harmful chemicals! Just bc something was considered okay in the past doesn’t mean that it’s okay now!!

      • Christin January 2, 2019 at 10:37 pm #

        How anybody can see this as an attack rather than a warning too many people who still on these plates, I’ll never know. They used to think asbestos was safe to but now we know better. why would you not want to be made aware of something that could be potentially harmful?

      • Kris January 3, 2019 at 3:45 am #

        You do realize that many many people still have their older Correlle dishes from 30 years ago, right? I have a couple of them from the mid 80’s. My grandmothers set from the early 80’s is still in the summer house (I won’t eat out them).

        How is protecting children from lead poisoning an “agenda”?

    • Joe November 27, 2018 at 10:20 am #

      No they will take something back that old, just toss them.

  2. Rebecca December 30, 2018 at 6:37 am #

    Why would you consider using these plates knowing that they have terrible chemicals on them that can harm you and your family?!! Judy bc something was okay in the past doesn’t mean it’s okay now when we have knowledge of the harm that it can do! ‍♀️

  3. Jackie Blevins December 30, 2018 at 4:11 pm #

    I have used these plates 40 plus years. Should I throw them out and buy new Corelle dishes?
    Maybe I can get cash back for new ones.

  4. Amy M. January 1, 2019 at 5:16 pm #

    I would follow with additional testing designed to determine what actually would leach into food under normal conditions.

    I am also wary of your credentials as you will profit slightly from people accessing the links you post. Please provide more accurate and scientific testing provided by a third party laboratory. This information is most important. In the scientific world, third party testing by an unrelated, not to benefit from the results organization would substantiate or disprove the results obtained by your method.

    By throwing the plates out, you are adding to the landfill issues we have in this country. I kindly request more analytical information.

  5. Amy M January 1, 2019 at 5:23 pm #

    All Corelle® stoneware products and glazes are made of clay-based materials and glazes used throughout the industry. Decorations, if present, are made from low-lead enamels and fired at temperatures exceeding 1000 degrees F, which binds any heavy metals both physically and chemically so that their release is minimized.

    This comes from theCorelle website.

  6. Becky January 2, 2019 at 9:34 pm #

    Tamara – you seem like a bitch. Get a real job

    • Tamara January 2, 2019 at 9:36 pm #

      Becky, why do you say that? Because you have these dishes and you are angry that they are positive for Lead?

      – Tamara

    • Kris January 3, 2019 at 3:59 am #

      How does protecting children and giving people knowledge make her a bitch?

      Why does this make you so angry? Why are you afraid of knowledge? Maybe you should see a therapist for that.

      She is a wife, a mother of lead poisoned children and a trained advocate for lead free households. That IS her job. We tell people everyday to do what they love and follow their passion. Tamara’s passion is protecting children and teaching others. The only problem with her job is she doesn’t get paid enough.

      • Tamara January 3, 2019 at 9:25 am #

        *Love*
        *Crying*

        Thank you.

    • Carrie January 3, 2019 at 4:00 pm #

      I am sorry that you are uneducated and feel the need to bash such a wonderful person who does wonderful work.

    • Nichole January 3, 2019 at 7:42 pm #

      Ooh Becky you seem to not have a clue. Sheep much?
      Maybe you have been lead poisoned.

  7. Alex January 2, 2019 at 10:31 pm #

    Becky- you seem like a troll. Get off the internet. This is information. Do what you want with it. This women is hardly making money off this work, as evidenced by the fact that her family is about to be homeless, AGAIN. jeez.

  8. Jenny January 3, 2019 at 9:19 am #

    I have the crazy daisy pattern of Corelle dishes that my grandmother purchased in the 80s as well as I can guess. However, mine has a different stamp on the back that looks more recent than yours. Have you done testing on the more recent dishes?

    • Tamara January 3, 2019 at 9:26 am #

      Hi Jenny,

      I haven’t tested too many recent ones, sorry about that.

      Tamara

  9. Terri January 7, 2019 at 2:48 am #

    My children have been eating off these plates since birth. The oldest is 14 now. As you can imagine, I am horrified. Is it possible that the lead and cadmium do not leach? That is a hope I am clinging to. Of course I’m throwing them out, but I’m hoping it’s possible that despite using these plates, my kids did not ingest lots of lead and cadmium because maybe these metals, although present in high amounts, did not leech out. Is this possible? Also, we microwave food on these plates. Does microwaving these plates increase lead and cadmium leeching?

    • Tamara January 7, 2019 at 8:49 am #

      Hi Terri,

      It is possible that the Lead and Cadmium do not leach, however I don’t advise coming to that conclusion with guess work. In the absence of laboratory testing of high lead dishes I think the safer choice is to not use them.

      I think the manufacturers of these products should do leach testing on their vintage dishware (using an independent lab) and if they leach they should inform the public – but I don’t think that is ever going to happen. I also think that even if they did not leach at one point, they may leach at some point in the future – especially with wear, heavy use and deterioration. Here’s a post I have written about that: https://tamararubin.com/topics/does-vintage-and-new-functional-pottery-and-dishware-have-unsafe-levels-of-lead/

      This is why the simplest solution is to buy lead-free dishes and emphasize food-based detox with your family (garlic, cilantro – etc.)

      Here’s a link to a very inexpensive set of Lead-free dishes: https://tamararubin.com/2018/10/toppic-lead-free-dish-set-service-for-four-for-under-43/

      You can also check out Ikea, Walmart and Target for their clear glass options and other lead-free options available at those stores (use the search bar on this blog or the Index in the header to look for Lead-free dishes or to look for products sold by those stores by store name.) You can also check out this link with links to many of the Lead-free dishes I have tested: https://tamararubin.com/2018/12/asktamara-which-dishes-are-lead-free/

      Tamara

  10. Terri January 7, 2019 at 2:55 am #

    Can you recommend a good home lead test kit? I am thinking that this would be the best way to determine if the lead leeches. Am I correct? And are there any home cadmium test kits available?

  11. Terri January 7, 2019 at 12:14 pm #

    My children have been eating off these plates since birth. The oldest is 14 now. As you can imagine, I am horrified. Is it possible that the lead and cadmium do not leach? That is a hope I am clinging to. Of course I’m throwing them out, but I’m hoping it’s possible that despite using these plates, my kids did not ingest lots of lead and cadmium because maybe these metals, although present in high amounts, did not leech out. Is this possible? Also, we microwave food on these plates. Does microwaving these plates increase lead and cadmium leeching?

    Can you recommend a good home lead test kit? I am thinking that this would be the best way to determine if the lead leeches. Am I correct? And are there any home cadmium test kits available?

  12. Terri January 7, 2019 at 1:54 pm #

    Sorry about my repeat post above. I posted it because I did not see my original posts appear. They appeared many hours after I posted them.

    • Tamara January 7, 2019 at 2:32 pm #

      No problem! Thanks.

      • Terri January 7, 2019 at 10:00 pm #

        Hi Tamara,

        Thank you very much for your replies to my questions. The links you provided are very helpful. Another question: do you know if microwaving these plates would increase the leaching of lead and cadmium from the plates? We have been microwaving food on these plates for many many years.

        • Tamara January 7, 2019 at 10:10 pm #

          Hi Terri,

          I think any heating with acidic foods could be a problem (tomato sauce and similar).

          T

  13. s topaz March 17, 2019 at 9:53 am #

    I remember years ago people worrying about lead crystal glassware + tableware and then reading an article proving that the food would need to be stored in it for a very long time (i.e. years) to absorb any of the lead from the glass.

    I’m sorry but her claims are unproven, nothing has been proven regarding leaching into foods. Her ‘tests’ are performed in her kitchen, which is not a sterile environment. She is a blogger, of which there are a dime a dozen. When people make these type of alarmist claims, it would be best to go by the wise old adage: “Don’t believe everything you hear and only half of what you see”. If this was indeed a true scientific fact, the population would have been made well aware of the dangers by now from reputable scientific laboratories.

    I would fact check all her ‘chicken little, sky-is-falling’ claims, before I swallow them hook, line and sinker. So I did…

    Here’s one common source out of many for checking anyone’s claims:

    https://www.snopes.com/fact-check/vintage-pyrex-contains-unsafe-levels-of-lead/?fbclid=IwAR0ltLL-ON0txOpp7i9EQOjwdC-HX0Zi0nHviieRZJHG9yRafZcmyOnJZ5c

  14. i-yi-yiii April 14, 2019 at 2:20 pm #

    Oh my….my grandparents had these exact dishes….i thought i might try to find a set of these but now i won’t. Thanks for the heads up about the lead content!

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